Dec 012016
 

We are starting to gear up for TMC17, which will be at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School  in Atlanta, GA (map is here) from July 27-30, 2017. We are looking forward to a great event! Part of what makes TMC special is the wonderful presentations we have from math teachers who are facing the same challenges that we all are.

To get an idea of what the community is interested in hearing about and/or learning about we set up a Google Doc (http://bit.ly/TMC17-1). It’s a GDoc for people to list their interests and someone who might be good to present that topic. The form is still open for editing, so if you have an idea of what you’d like to see someone else present as you’re writing your own proposal, feel free to add it!

This conference is by teachers, for teachers. That means we need you to present. Yes, you! In the past everyone who submitted on time was accepted, however, this year we cannot guarantee that everyone who submits a proposal will be accepted. We do know that we need 10-12 morning sessions (these sessions are held 3 consecutive mornings for 2 hours each morning) and 12 sessions at each afternoon slot (12 half hour sessions that will be on Thursday, July 27 and 48 one hour sessions that will be either Thursday, July 27, Friday, July 28, or Saturday, July 29). That means we are looking for somewhere around 70 sessions for TMC17.

What can you share that you do in your classroom that others can learn from? Presentations can be anything from a strategy you use to how you organize your entire curriculum. Anything someone has ever asked you about is something worth sharing. And that thing that no one has asked about but you wish they would? That’s worth sharing too. Once you’ve decided on a topic, come up with a title and description and submit the form. The description you submit now is the one that will go into the program, so make sure it is clear and enticing. Please make sure that people can tell the difference between your session and one that may be similar. For example, is your session an Intro to Desmos session or one for power users? This helps us build a better schedule and helps you pick the sessions that will be most helpful to you!

If you have an idea for something short (between 5 and 15 minutes) to share, plan on doing a My Favorite. Those will be submitted at a later date.

The deadline for submitting your TMC Speaker Proposal is January 16, 2017 at 11:59 pm Eastern time. This is a firm deadline since we will reserve spots for all presenters before we begin to open registration on February 1st.

Thank you for your interest!

Team TMC17 – Lisa Henry, Lead Organizer, Mary Bourassa, Tina Cardone, James Cleveland, Daniel Forrester, Megan Hayes-Golding, Cortni Muir, Jami Packer, Sam Shah, and Glenn Waddell

Sep 062015
 

In my Feedly this morning popped up the article by Larry Ferlazzo called, “Disappointing NY Times Article On Teachers & ‘A Sharing Economy’.” Okay, let me be more blunt. I am not disappointed in the NYT, I am frustrated and a little ticked off. It stems from this article in the NYT: A Sharing Economy where Teachers Win by Natasha Singer.

Read the article. I call foul AND shenanigans. How much did TeachersPayTeachers pay for this fluff piece that was nothing more than an advertisement for teachers selling out other teachers.

youblewit

Maybe it is because I am active and love the #MTBoS (that is the MathTwitterBlogo’Sphere, if you are not familiar with it.) I embrace the sharing, the collaboration and the freely giving of resources that the math teachers do on Twitter, their blogs and the internet in general.

The article should have been titled, “A sharing economy where teachers win, but collaboration dies.” Sure, some teacher just made $1000 by selling her lesson plans to a 1000 different teachers for a buck. She won, but collaboration died. Is she seeking feedback from people who have used her lessons? Is she improving them by discussing and talking about how others have used them? Probably not. It is in a store, and people are buying it. There is no reason or need to improve it.

Meanwhile, in the #MTBoS, teachers are making, sharing, improving and resharing lessons all the time. They are coming together to make better lessons. And then, they talk about these lessons, which spawn more, better lessons. This is a collaborative community where ALL teachers win, and more importantly, our learners win. And our learners continue to win. Over and over again.

Seriously, look at the amount of resources freely created and given away.

First up, websites created by teachers collaborating:

  • Let’s start with the MTBoS Directory. No one claims this is an exhaustive list. It requires teachers to add their names to it, but there are currently 344 teachers in the list, all with an online presence, and all sharing things.
  • Nixthetricks.com – created by Tina Cardone and teachers all over the #MTBoS who contributed tricks. You can download the most excellent book for free.
  • Fawn Nguyen’s Visual Patterns and Math Talks. Both are excellent sites. I have used the Visual Patterns site frequently in my high school classroom, and am working on learning more about Math Talks and implementing them in the college classroom where I am now.
  • Would you Rather Math is a site I used regularly in my teaching as well. Great questions, created by and curated by John Stevens.
  • Michael Pershan’s Math Mistakes. See an interesting math mistake? Submit it to this site and have a discussion on the thinking the learner made while making the mistake. We can learn more from mistakes than we can from correct work.
  • Dan Meyer’s Google spreadsheet of 3 Acts lessons. More on this to come. I am working on an idea taking shape out of my current position as a Master Teacher with a UTeach model school.
  • Mary Bourassa’s Which One Doesn’t Belong. So Mary saw Christopher Danielson’s great shapes idea, and realized that there was some amazing math thinking that could be done. BOOM, another collaborative website created.
  • Open Middle Dan Meyer introduced the idea, Nanette Johnson, Robert Kaplinsky and Bryan Anderson ran with and created the platform.
  • Desmos Activity Bank A site created by Jed Butler out of the need to share Desmos files, first showed at TMC15 at Harvey Mudd College.
  • MTBoS Activity Bank created by John Stevens (second time his name is on the list) to collect and curate some of the awesome materials created. Anyone can submit their own, and searching is easy.
  • The MTBoS Blog Search also created by John Stevens (I don’t think he sleeps). This site allows you search the blogs of a long list of math teachers for lessons, content, whatever you are looking for.
  • Robert Kaplinsky has a Problem Based Search Engine, to find those specialized lessons that are, you guessed it, problem based!
  • The Welcome to the MathTwitterBlogoSphere website has a further collection of collaborative efforts that includes some of the above but is even larger.

But that isn’t even all of it. There are teachers who are collecting curriculum, links or materials and sharing it all back out; lock, stock and barrel. These teachers have “Virtual Filing Cabinets” full of lessons that have been tried and tested, re-written and shared back out. Some call their pages VFC’s, some are just curated sites of materials.

And then there are great organizations giving away curriculum:

  • Illustrative Mathematics, free ever-more-complete curriculum that is CCSS aligned and incredibly high quality.
  • Shells Center/Mathematics Assessment Project, good as lessons, problems or assessments. I forget about this site until I am desperate, and then kick myself because it is just so good and thorough.
  • Mathalicious has free lessons and paid lessons. I have used them in class. They are worth paying for!
  • Igor Kokcharov has an international effort in APlusClick. Lots of great problems and lessons.

And this list is FAR from complete. It is what I pulled together in 15 minutes of thought. And this list does not even begin to talk about the 180 blogs

So, NY Times and Natasha Singer. You blew it. You didn’t show teachers winning, you showed teachers selling out. If you want to see winning teachers, click on any link above and read their sites.

The above are all winning teachers. TeachersPayTeachers is an example of teachers losing out on this kind of collaboration.

Aug 312015
 

I have to be honest, I started, stopped, deleted, restarted, deleted and started this post again repeatedly over the last few weeks. Why? Well one reason is my computer died in the middle of a post, and it sat for a week while I was getting it repaired. Whatever. Lame excuse.

Another reason is that I was not sure what to say, or how I felt about the change from high school teacher to college instructor. I think I am still not sure, but I am wrapping my head around it more and feeling better about myself and my thinking on that topic. This post will be a bit rambling, and more than a little stream of consciousness, but bear with it.

So, here it goes; good and bad. I am going to just get it all out and see where it leads.

do not follow leave a trail

First, the bad: I felt very guilty about leaving my school. Seriously. The process of getting this position took all summer. The interview was a 7 hour long day in the middle of July, and it was a week after that before I knew if I got the job or not. Teachers reported back to school on the 5th of August. I was not able to give my school or my department much time to hire a new math teacher to replace me. I hate that. That I left my high school without giving them a long time to search and find a replacement makes me feel like I let the people who I had a strong attachment and bond with down.

The good: This new program at the University of Nevada, Reno is amazing. Seriously. Why is not every university in the US using this model of teacher development for math and science? I mean, really. We all recognize there is difficulty in getting math and science teachers. The UTeach model out of Austin, TX is a great model to fight the shortage. It is actually doing good recruitment and instruction to bring better math and science teachers to the classroom. Let me tell you the sales pitch (and it is a sales pitch that I have given to several freshmen classes.)

The Step 1 and Step 2 classes are free through a tuition rebate (after you successfully pass the classes, you get your money back.)

In these classes, you will observe twice, and teach three times in upper elementary (Step 1) and middle school (Step 2) classrooms.

At the end of the year, you will have two free credits, AND you will KNOW if you have an interest in teaching. If you don’t, because whatever, you walk away and you have two credits, no money spent, and you have lost nothing but a little time.

BUT, if you think that teaching may be something you are interested in, you finish the major you are in (right now Chemistry, Biology, Physics and Mathematics, but that will expand) AND you take the NevadaTeach program classes and you will graduate in 4 years with two degrees. Your science / math degree AND the coursework necessary for a teaching license.

Yes, free credits. Two degrees, two career paths, and no extra time or money spent to earn either one.

This program sells itself. We were expected to have 30 students in the program this semester. My partner Master Teacher and I recruited 45. We are 150% over the goal for enrollment. That is exciting, motivating and all around wonderful.

Then, we actually met our students.

OMG WOW.

On the first day of class (heck the ONLY day of class so far) we asked them to write why they took the Step 1 class. Here are a few, representative samples of why they enrolled:

I want a second choice if I can’t get into med school  (this came up several times.)

It seems like a fun program to be in, very excited about going into classrooms to teach an be like hands on.  (again, several of this type.)

I want to have my double major through this program and I think it will offer lots of opportunity in the future.  (wow, just wow.)

I want to explore teaching as an option.  (no fewer than 5 people said this.)

I’m taking step 1 because I want to have the best choice that allows me to have the best option to succeed in my future career.  (yes, this is the same as the last one, options, but notice the addition of choice. )

These are our students’ words. No editing. Just my comments in parenthesis. We have a motivated group of students who think teaching may be an interesting career. It is up to Megan and I to show them that it can be.

How do we do that?

One major element of our classroom and the program is that it centers around the 5E model of instruction. As we teach science or math lessons to our learners to teach to the ES or MS students, they are all 5E, inquiry based lessons. The math teachers who graduate from this program are going to have a strong basis for creating inquiry  based lessons for their classrooms. This is truly exciting. I am fully committing to dispatching an illusion of learning.

illusionoflecture1

What else is exciting is that this program did not exist last semester. I am part of the first year of creating the program from the ground up. If it fails, I will be a large part of why it fails. If it succeeds then I will be a part of why it succeeds (well not really, it can’t help but succeed.) But it is a risk to leave the safety of teaching, being department chair, teaching the courses I love, interacting with amazing learners and stop all of that for the complete uncertainty of a program that does not exist, in a completely different environment, and a radically different culture.

great achievements involve great risk

So, do I step up and leave everything I was comfortable with behind and bet it all on a new, untested, untried program to create and build new, more and better math and science teachers? Clearly the answer I chose was yes, but it was a tough decision. I miss the teachers I interacted with daily, but I know that I am doing something that will benefit more students in the future than I could just as a high school teacher.

As far as the massive culture shock, I have overcome it. Mostly. I have had a couple of “Am I on candid camera” moments. Being told “good job” for submitting $20,000 technology requests that were detailed and approved. Being told “ask for it, we don’t short change instruction, if you need it to teach, ask” by directors of the program. Coming from K-12 where we were starved for resources and now have the resources is odd.

Having to navigate the minefield of tenured professors walled gardens has been a shock. As a high school teacher, I just did things. I always could justify it because it was in the best interest of my learners, so there was never any blowback, just an “okay, that works, thank you.” Now, however, that is not always the case. And, what is in the best interest of my students is NOT the best interest of the departments students, the colleges’ students, or the University’s students. That is absolutely true. So having to think bigger picture and take a step back is new for me. Not hard. Just new.

The last thing that really is different for me is that I always sought out teachers to inspire me, to motivate me. As a high school teacher I lived by this quote daily.

Teachers inspire other teachers

My list was easy. Go on Twitter. Search for #MTBoS. Follow them. All of them. I have found so many teachers who pushed me to be better through their ideas, motivation, and inspiration that I never felt alone the last 4 years.

I am feeling alone now. I have a beautiful office. (seriously, it is the best office on campus, look at the view from my office window).

2015-07-27 17.56.52

 

I have a fellow Master Teacher, Megan, who is amazing. I have directors in my program who are supportive, helpful and all around great people. The faculty and staff here are supportive and helpful.

And yet, I feel alone. The college culture is different than K-12. There are no faculty plays. No “Friday happy hours.” No fabulous twitter chats of supportive higher ed professors. At this level it is about what you produce, not how you feel. K12 is different. I am working over that, around that, and through that, but it is true. I think this is the largest culture shock to deal with now. I can still drop into the Friday happy hour, but I am not part of that group. Will they still have me? And what am I producing now for my new position?

🙂

Yes, I just smiled. I realized what I have to make sure I produce.

Teachers inspire other teachers I need to be that teacher who uplifts, inspires, and drives others.

More so now than ever.

May 292015
 

Wow, it has been a while since I posted anything, and I need to share a ton of things I have done. I predict that I will post a lot in the next several weeks. The school year is winding down, but my learners are ramping up. Grad school is down for the summer (with the exception of an independent study on activity theory) so I have much more time to write.

My learners are working on their final exam / projects, and they are hating me right now. They realize that the stats has a purpose, and that it is far harder than they thought. The handout for my assignment is here if you want to use it, or see what I required.

The only reason I veto projects are because it is too easy, too hard (and it is my opinion for that, although we discuss the reason why so they have an opportunity to revise and make it appropriate) or if the subject matter is just too sensitive / personal and it is in the realm of professionals, not high school learners.

Below is the list of surveys / observational studies / experiments that my learners have decided to undertake this year, broken up by period. It is a rather impressive list!

———Period 2———–

  • Social media use / grades
  • How do adults / teenagers differ in choosing restaurants
  • Does quizlet or flashcards help more in learning vocab (using ancient Sumerian words?!)
  • Does education really affect income (using census data from several zipcodes in the city)
  • Is there an association between a school’s weightlifting records and win/loss at sports?
  • Is sex ed successful?
  • Does involvement in club cheer affect grades (4 different age groups)
  • Do taller people run faster, looking at high school, college and Olympic atheletes?
  • Does appearance have an impact on grades?
  • General questions about tobacco use and quitting
  • Which costs more, male or female beauty products?
  • Quality of life of the parents / learners in school
  • Which area of the city has more trash on the sides of the roads?
  • Does music affect memory (experiment)?
  • How do you use social media?
  • What is your perception of LBGT issues?

———Period 3———–

  • How does sports affect grades?
  • Are oreos really double stuffed? (I never showed my class the story on this, this team came up with it on their own! Love it)
  • Is bullying an issue, how large?
  • Are drivers more likely to stop at a stop sign when they are being watched?
  • An experiment on what type of information changes learners opinions on drinking age.
  • Does work hours affect GPA?
  • Does being exempt from an enrichment class at school affect GPA?
  • Are cheetos packaging regarding number of pieces correct?
  • Does social media use hurt GPA?
  • Is the dress code at school appropriate?

———Period 5———–

  • Does the sugar content of cereals affect the placement of the cereals in the grocery store?
  • Does music affect memory?
  • An experiment on whether or not gender effects whether or not people help with dropped books in the hallways.
  • How does our school compare to other schools in the community service of the learners?
  • Does sexism exist in the high school population?
  • Does the perception of animal rights change from learners to adults in the building?
  • What kinds of social media is most prevalent & how should the school use social media?
  • Who is bullied most over social media, males or females?
  • How does M-M vs. F-F & hair length affect the attitudes towards GLBT youth in stores (a very daring observational study)
  • What drugs are prevalently used in the high school per grade level?
  • Is marijuana use a problem in the high school?

As you can see, there is a huge variety (and some major overlap) between the different classes and projects. Each group is working their way to answering their questions, with the final exam being a presentation of their results.

Always exciting.

Nov 112014
 

On this bright,cheery Veteran’s day I took some time to clean up my reader, delete a bunch of feeds that I don’t read any more, organize the math teacher and other teacher feeds a bit and catch up on a couple of posts that I saved but didn’t have a chance to read yet. Be aware that the following is not a happy one, but a frustrated one. You can skip to the bottom to see the conclusion that is positive if you like.

 

—- Really, I am setting up an argument here in the beginning and middle, the end has a positive message. Totally okay if you skip the argument. —

 

What got me started writing was a statement by Dan Meyer that he followed Peg Cagle because, “she understands the concerns of Internet-enabled math teachers and she also understand the politics that concern the NCTM board of directors.” (via)

I read the link about “understanding concerns” which led me to think about the organizations I belong to and send money to each year. And let me be upfront about this. I am a member of the NCTM and have been continuously since I was in grad school getting my teaching credentials. I am actually subscribed to more than one journal, and have attended a national conference, a couple of regionals, and a couple of institutes. I have had district funding for some of this, but the majority have been paid for by me with my own money. I am critiquing the organization from the inside, not throwing bricks from the outside.

Okay, with that out of the way. I looked up the NCTM and found that they follow only 226 people / organizations. That’s it. Some of them are classroom teachers, but the teachers are vastly the minority. They follow mainly groups, college professors, and reporters.

nctm

But they are a large national organization. They can’t spend the time to read all the chatter from practicing math teachers. Let’s give them the benefit of the doubt. What about my local groups? Well the Northern NV Math Council does not even HAVE a Twitter presence. None. Scratch them off the list. Is it wrong that they don’t have a presence? No, that is their choice. I joined them in the past and suggested it. They refused because, “teachers don’t have the time for it.” Oh well.

What about the Southern NV Math Council? They do have a Twitter feed. They must follow lots of math teachers and spread the wonderfulness that is our math classrooms? No.

snmath

They follow 83 accounts, very few of which are math teachers. They have only 25 followers. I guess they are only slightly more engaged with the math teachers in Las Vegas than the NNMC is in Reno. But the state organization is doing better, right?

nvmath

No. They follow 83 accounts as well, virtually none of which are actual math teachers. I guess NV is a write off as far as math teacher engagement. I posted this frustration on Twitter, and Lisa Henry shared her state organization.

ohiomath  and I looked up the CA Math Council camath

Seriously folks. If the NCTM is wondering why math teachers are leaving and thinking it is not relevant, these screenshots encapsulate it pretty easily. These are organizations that are pushing to us, but not engaging with us. I only looked at number accounts they followed. Look at their tweet counts. The Nevada Math Council has 36 tweets? The CA Math Council has 552? They have  100,000 math teachers in CA, the birthplace of Twitter and they have only tweeted 552 times? The NCTM has 27,000 followers and have tweeted only 4500 times? Most of which are plugging their upcoming conferences?

But I did say I would look at all the organizations of which I am a professional member. Here they are; the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics and the American Statistical Association.

ncsm

asa

The NCSM even follows me!? They follow MORE people than the EVERY organization listed above COMBINED! Now we know that following someone does not mean engaging with someone, but it is certainly true that you cannot engage if you do not follow. The chance of the NCSM engaging with math teachers (and look at who they follow, there are many math teachers in the list) is much higher than the NCTM, Ohio NCTM, CA NCTM, and both NV NCTM groups.

The ASA? I joined them to get some additional AP Stats materials through their magazines. They are a specialty group, but they still do a better job than the state general organizations. The general organizations that should be closer to us as math teachers.

 

—- Okay ,the positive that exists after the complaining. —

What really makes this important to me is we are forming a State Chapter of the NCSM. I volunteered to be a member of the committee. I did that a week ago before I thought of doing this comparison, but now I am firmly on the side of participating strongly. NV needs an organization that will engage and lead math teachers. We certainly are not getting either from the NNMC, the NMC or the SNMC. We get ignored and told, but not engaged.

What is odd is the leadership of these groups ARE math teachers. The leaders are people I know (at least in the NNMC) and yet they do not engage? This is a frustrating situation. How many other teachers are frustrated with their local group too?

I am going to send this post to the organizer of the NCSM so she knows where I stand and what I feel the problems are in NV. It appears this is not a NV problem, but a nationwide problem. It is not a problem of “Math teachers don’t have the time” like I was told previously. It is a problem of organizations that are supposed to be leading us, instead are ignoring us.

The new NV Chapter of the NCSM really does need to be a leader. The National NCSM clearly is trying to have more of a leader role than the other groups. I need to do my part locally to make this happen here too.

 

As a counterpoint to my complaining, here is my profile and a couple random profiles. Ilana Horn is a professor of mathematics education (I recommend following her if you don’t.) Dave is a teacher of high school math as well. I just picked them randomly out of my feed. Teachers do have the time. In the vacuum of leadership, we are constructing meaning on our own and further marginalizing the institutions that created the vacuum.

glennilana

dave

Sep 022014
 

success

 

Today was mostly successful for my learners! Yay. I am behind in the book keeping / grading department so I won’t talk about that much. This is always my downfall, and it is so easy to have a conflict of interest between grading effectively and timely, and time spent producing interesting fun lessons that teach! It is worse this year for me because of grad school on top of it.  Enough about the Failure, on to the Success!

AP Statistics

I did a “I have, Who Has” exercise with vocab from Experimental Design and Surveys. It was tough going at first. I screwed up the instructions and suggested they trade cards in the first period. Don’t do that. I think better instructions are:

1. You all have a card with a word, the “I have experimental design” for example.

2. Underneath that word is a definition. It is NOT the definition of the word above, but the definition to a different word.

3. Find the person who has the definition of your word, and then stand next to them.

4. When you are done, you will have a giant circle of definitions.

5. AFTER the exercise is over, I let them take the 4 pages of cards with them. Yes, I made copies for every single learner. Now they did the exercise AND there is a set for them to take with them with which to study.

The biggest problem I had when doing this is the learners looking to me for validation. One class today dove right in and struggled with it and asked me almost no questions. The other class, oh boy. They wanted me to validate every answer. Every time I tried to get them to validate the answers themselves they were frustrated and really tried to get me involved. I finally had to tell the class, “No.” Stop and think about it as a group.

In the end, both classes today were successful, but I wanted greater fluidity. One problem is neither class really had a leader who took charge. It is a work in progress for sure.

 Algebra 2

This was a failure. I did @Cheesemonkey’s Speed Dating (and @mathymeg07 and I typeset files her files too) and was horrified by the lack of understanding of transformations of functions.

Sigh.

By the end of the period they were doing them okay. Not with any fluidity, not with any sense of understanding. I will do this exercise again. Absolutely.

They were frustrated and I was too. They wanted to do a table for every single function. Not good. By the end of class, I heard, “Aha, this is so much easier” and “Okay, I think I am getting it now.”

Next class we really need to get to, “Okay, Waddell, give me your best shot.” Eventually we will get there.

So, my lesson for tomorrow’s Alg2 class is already written. Do today over.

Time to grade more work again. Must get more things into gradebook!

Jul 302014
 

Ok, I am doing this quick post instead of the longer, more thoughtful #TMC14 posts. Sorry, but this is too interesting to let drop.

@JustinAion had an idea to turn your twitter feed into a Wordle to see what it says about what you use Twitter for.

Great! So I did it, and I wondered right away if there would be a significant difference between Twitter and my blog.

So….  [click to embiggen]

Wordle TwitterTwitter

Wordle blogblog

 

Hmm, What do you notice?  Yea, there are some super, immediate differences. I use Twitter to talk with people. Twitter is about reaching out, sharing and discussing. But now exclude the people, and what do you notice? I see the RT in the lower right. I do share what other people have said, fairly frequently. I also see the “Learners” in the upper left corner. I talk about my learners fairly regularly too. “Think” “School” “Stats” are also fairly common. Makes sense, I am a math teacher.

My blog on the other hand is not about people, unless it is about my learners. My blog is about geogebra (honestly, that surprises me), AP, Tags (that is the sharing resources that I find through Diigo) and lots of learning words: consistently, effort, favorite, questions, mindset, etc.

Is there something truly interesting here? Not sure. But it does show me that I personally use Twitter very differently than I use my blog, and when anyone now asks me why I use Twitter or why I blog, I have an answer.

Twitter (for me) is for reaching out to people and communicating with others.

Blogging (for me) is for collecting thoughts and sharing out resources.

I think that is the most valuable part of the exercise. I learned something very useful for me to use in communicating with other teachers about the technology.

Ok, ok, TMC14 posts are being worked on. I promise.

Aug 012013
 

These are my initial thoughts. There will be more coming.

What can I say, just as last year, it was awesome. This year it was awesomer! (Yes, that is a word, I just used it, so it works.)

Last year I was cowed and nervous. I was a “new” teacher in a group of amazing teachers who contributed and offered so much to the Math Teaching Community that I felt I had little to share or offer. I was kind of new to the community and I was uncertain about my ability to contribute something of value to the more experienced teachers. By the time I left, I realized that EVERYONE has something to offer EVERYONE else. Teaching is a craft that takes time and energy to develop, and what makes the best teachers is they have questions and weaknesses, and they are constantly trying to improve.

Flash forward to Philadelphia this year and I am more confident in my pedagogical knowledge AND less confident I am a great teacher. I have been working with and talking with this group of individuals on twitter and my blog, but I have been struggling with pushing my learners to the highest levels of rigor.

Bottom line; I am exactly like everyone of this group of collectively amazing teachers who all struggle and suck at teaching at times (although maybe I suck just a little bit more than some of them). And I feel comfortable sharing that with this group.

The first thing that makes TwitterMathCamp different than NCTM or the AP Institutes is the social element. We know each other and have been working with each other all year. We are a group of friends that have met ONCE in person if we are lucky, otherwise we have never met. This creates a trust and that carries over into the sessions. Furthermore, there are social events planned that most people attend. As I was walking home from the Trivia Night event, one of the attendees who is also a college professor said that, “The most productive time at a major conference is the time spent in the bars afterwards getting to know people.” Why? Because that is where RELATIONSHIPS are built.

Yup. That about sums it up. Except at TMC, that level of socialization occurs all day long.

Many fellow tweeps said that this conference is special to them. My contribution to this discussion is that at this conference, the #backchannel that occurs at NCTM occurs equal with the content of the presentation. Only at this conference is the importance of the sharing, retweeting and communication just as important as what is occurring in the presentation.

Someone holds up a book as a great example of content, and someone in the audience finds the book on amazon and tweets out a link. The presenter says something important, and half the audience tweets out the statement, and 10 other people comment and build on the idea. All this while a conversation is going on around the topic being presented in the room.

Notice I have not yet mentioned any content we discussed? I have a notebook full of it, but the passion for math and relationship building is what I wanted to discuss first. This is what good teaching is all about, and if I can build ¼ of that that level of relationship with my learners, I have done a great thing.

Jun 212012
 

I have said to many teachers that the best professional development I have engaged in is on Twitter. (I am @gwaddellnvhs by the way.)  One of the difficulties I have had using twitter, however is the storing of great ideas, great tweets, great links, and threads of conversations that I have had.

For instance, the bookclub I engage in regularly (current hashtag is #lit4math, focused on the book “Literacy strategies for improving mathematics instruction”) we have great discussions and sharing of ideas. And they are gone in the twitter stream almost instantly! ARG. That is the problem I have had other teachers tell me they run into, and therefore they don’t use twitter.

Or, I am at school, and see a great post that has a link from a person I generally want to follow up on, but although twitter is unblocked at school, the link shortener t.co is blocked. Or I am on my phone, and want to quickly save a tweet, so I favorite it, and then have to go through and find the favorite tweets under my account, which is a hassle.

The Solution

Well, all these problems go away with a very easy to use service called If This, Then That or ifttt.com. This service does exactly what the name sounds like (well, if you have taken a computer programming class you understand what it does.) It monitors your account, and when it sees a pre-programmed trigger, the “IF”, “THEN” it does “THAT”.

How I use it, IF it sees that I favorite a tweet in twitter, it then appends the tweet into my Evernote account.  It takes a minute or two to show up, but it has not failed yet.

I also have it searching twitter for the hashtag #lit4math, and it appends all tweets with that hashtag into a note in Evernote.  Sweet! I don’t have to try to copy manually the conversations any more. The only drawback to this method is twitter will not allow locked users tweets to show up in a search stream. Therefore, users who are part of the conversation who are locked won’t show up. That is unfortunate, but true of all methods of archiving tweets I have used.

I also have a recipe (what ifttt.com calls their programs) running that appends any tweet made to me into an Evernote note. It makes sure I don’t miss something that was sent directly to me.

I am very pleased with this set up. It has truly streamlined and made my use of Twitter easier and more efficient. Check out ifttt.com. It is free, and very worth your time.