Oct 122016
 

I had the opportunity to read a preprint edition of Malke Rosenfeld’s new book, Math on the Move, and here are my thoughts.

First off, let me start off with what this book is not. As educators we have probably sat through a professional development where someone told us that in math class, we can appeal to the “kinesthetic learning style” by having the learners up and moving around the classroom. We can appeal to “kinesthetic learners” by having them move their arms, or by doing gallery walks. I have sat through several of these. [yes, I put that phrase in quotes on purpose. I do not believe in ‘learning styles’. Multiple Intelligences, yes, learning styles, no.]

Rosenfeld’s book is not this. No where near this. This book is not about “kinesthetic learning” this is about making connections in mathematics through motion, body, and dance for elementary school learners. It is an amazing concept to think about. I really appreciate that on page 2, she says, “not all of dance is mathematical and not all math is danceable.” That sets the tone for the entire book. Rosenfeld looks for the strengths in using movement, and using the body as a thinking tool. This is a powerful idea, and the first chapter of the book is about what doesn’t and does count as using the body as a thinking tool. I loved the deep thinking this chapter provoked, because it made really think about dance and movement with respect to math.

And, let me be honest. My knowledge of math through motion is very limited. My idea of dancing is more aligned with this guy than anything that someone else would consider “dancing.” Honestly, I wondered for a moment if someone had recorded me actually dancing when I saw this gif.

dancing-gif via

But, despite the fact I am both musically and rhythmically challenged, I have always thought there was opportunity to connect math and movement. I have never figured out how, but I have been intrigued by the idea. After reading the table on page 17 I realized why.

table of nouns and verbs about math movement

The verbs of math are aligned with the verbs of dancing. The nouns of math are also aligned in large part. Looking at the list, and knowing, intellectually, about the ideas of dance, it is easy to understand how strong the connection is. Through examples of learner work, QR codes showing video of learners moving, multiple lesson examples, pictures, role playing examples, and well developed explanations, Rosenfeld shows me how to implement dance in a very constructive way in the elementary classroom. By the end of chapter 3, I was willing to try it with elementary kids tomorrow. That takes a lot for me to say, because I am secondary through and through. Little kids scare me. But I am so excited by the opportunity I see after the first three chapters of lessons that I am willing to try them. They are so interesting!

I think the real power comes later in the book when the 6 stages are developed further.

  1. Understand
  2. Experiment
  3. Create
  4. Combine
  5. Transform
  6. Communicate

These stages allow learners to move from the understanding of a concept and goal to the creation of a multi-step dance pattern and ending with the discussion and communication of the idea through a presentation of the dance. The last half of the book has QR Codes on almost every single page with video link examples. The depth of knowledge these can provide is stunning.

All in all, the more I read and find the joy in mathematical dancing, the more opportunity I see to push this into the upper levels. There is so much more that can be done with this idea beyond the boring and basic. It might even make me a better dancer! Well, no. It isn’t a miracle book, just a really good math book. It is authentic movement, not the usual fake stuff we see.

I think it is time to bring real motion in to math class, get learners moving in purposeful, meaningful ways, and leverage that motion into strong mathematical knowledge.

If you want to read a chapter for yourself, check it out on Heinemann’s website.

rosenfeld_cover_web

  3 Responses to “Math on the Move”

  1. Thank you for sharing your ideas and this resource. I teach in an all girls school, where dance is a large part of the curriculum for many. I have often thought about how I can do a project in which the girls ‘mathematize’ their choreography on the stage, and I had not even thought about simple body moves! I will find out more about that book – I teach mostly 7-8-9 students, so functions and graphing are very relevant!

  2. Most welcome Jjfreo,
    You may also be interested in the MathDance website and materials. http://www.mathdance.org/ I had the book at one time, but did not find it as interesting to me. You may have a better need for it though, than I did.

  3. […] Well, I’ve been reading about what Glenn Waddell is reading – a pre-release edition of Malke Rosenfeld’s forthcoming book Math on the […]

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