Aug 032016
 

Day one of my Knowing and Learning class will be about the syllabus, the 4 major assignments, and starting the conversation regarding what it means to Know something or Learn something.

There are going to be 4 major assignments. Two interviews, a midterm, and a lesson plan for the final. The first interview is a “expert v novice” interview. An expert is someone who has a PhD in the topic at hand, while a novice is a freshman / sophomore in the topic. My learner will come up with a short, open ended question set of interest, and compare the difference between how experts and how novices view the material. In math, it could be about factoring quadratics, or polynomial long division.

Next up is an interview of an expert regarding questioning techniques and going deeper on the issue presented before. How does the expert question others on this topic. Then a midterm on the theories presented so far, and finally a lesson plan, written according to one of the theories in the class, taking into account the information gained in the two interviews. This will pull the entire course together.

But back to the first day. How DO we get learners to understand that not everyone Learns the same things from the same lesson, and how do we get learners to understand that Knowing is different from Learning? That is a new concept for many learners. I am going to use an instrument that I asked people on Twitter to answer.

First off, because they are in my circle of friends on Twitter, I can assume these individuals are mostly teachers of math. That is a pretty good guess. There may be some higher ed people in the sample, perhaps some science teachers, but … mostly math.

majors

Um, no. That is a totally incorrect assumption. Or is it? Just because someone majored in something other than math, that doesn’t mean they don’t teach math (after all, I majored in Physics and Philosophy.) Still, assumptions can kill.

scale

Okay, I have to put this here. I like Google Forms, but COME ON GOOGLE! Why don’t you have the words on the graph? This is the scale used for the following responses.

act sat

calc

science

I think it is interesting to note that the teachers are falling mostly on the “nurture” side of things, but not all, and not always. And notice that on testing, regardless of the test, there is almost complete agreement, but there is a difference when it comes between math and science.

Here is the scale for the next graphs.

scale 2

Compare these next graphs. Good teachers are born, not made. Most of the responses were disagree, but 7 people said no comment or agree. But, 9 people said disagree or no comment to the Theory is important to becoming a good teacher. (BTW, I was very happy to see this group had the same outcome for being a physicist as a teacher, that made me smile.)

What does it mean that more people think teachers are made, but at the same time, not all of those view theory as important? Hmm.

born not made

theory

seasons

math facts

Interesting. Strong agreement between Math Facts and Seasons, but almost total agreement that calculus does not need to be a graduation requirement. Interesting dichotomy between the graphs. Why? Why do we place some knowledge at a higher level than other knowledge? Why isn’t all knowledge equally important?

If all knowledge is not equal, is all learning also not equal?

Honestly, I expected this type of response from the educators who use Twitter (totally a convenience and voluntary response sample.) There is nothing unexpected here. But look at the variety still. There is not complete agreement on anything.

I am excited to see what my learners say. I believe they will have much more varied responses to everything, which makes the entire exercise more interesting. Now, however, I can also show them what a group of “Experts” in education think as compared to their responses.

Which lets me set up the “Expert v. Novice” interview event better.

Thank you Tweeps. You just made my first day even better!

(btw; any other conversation or comments you want to make? These are really interesting questions!)

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