Feb 022016
 

On Friday last week at the end of the Step 1 class we were talking about engagement, high fives, enthusiasm, and why we are teachers. The conversation started with these two questions:

  1.  Write about a lesson / teacher who you remember using a 5E model.
  2. Write about a lesson / teacher who you remember did NOT use a 5E model.

The conversation led to the idea that the teachers they remembered from #1 were teachers the learners in class remembered fondly, they remembered their classes with enthusiasm, and they remembered specific lessons from those classes. The teachers in category #2 were still good teachers (I did stress this) but the entire conversation was less enthusiastic. No lessons specifically were brought up, and it the words “favorite teacher” was never mentioned. As in, not even close.

And then I challenged the class. “What category of teacher do you want to be?” I let them think about it.

And then, I brought up the fact that I had high fived them the last two weeks. I asked why they thought I did that, and how did it make them feel. The conversation was epic. They realized how connected and interested just that one little thing made them.

At this point, after I explained my High 5 philosophy.

Then, as I do, I ask, “What other questions do you have?” That opened the door.

One question was, “Why do you call us learners?” Answer, because students study, and I don’t care how much you study. I care how much you learn, so I refuse to call you students. Also, if you have students in the room, then you also have …. [they said a teacher] … So, if I call you learners, that what am I? A learner, too. And I promise, I will learn as much from you this semester as you learn from me.

After I explained about my “learner” philosophy, someone in the class said, “You should make a mix tape.”

That statement stuck with me all weekend.

So, here is a mix of Waddell’s greatest hits. Now, before you say, “Well, anyone can be egotistical enough to write these,” know that I did not write these. I asked my learners from last year on Facebook to tell me what stuck with them. These are things they reported almost a year after being in my class. This is “My Mix Tape.”  My comments are in [].

——

“I don’t care how much you study, I care how much you learn.”

“If it was easy, it wouldn’t be worth your time.”

“You can’t memorize math, you have to learn it to understand.”

“Things don’t ‘cancel’ out.”  [did you know teachers use the word “cancel” to mean as many as four or five completely different things? This is a huge pet peeve of mine.]

But this is the whole quote of what was written: “Things don’t cancel out.” I know it was for math because things don’t disappear they become a 1 or 0 but it applies to life on how things don’t just disappear and cancel out. There are reasons, hurts, joys, etc that come. There is so much more to things than just “canceling” them.  [Seriously, can I cry now?]

“Amazeballs”

“You’re awesome remember that.”

“Use your Awesome brains.”

“You have all the knowledge, remember to use it.”

“Stop complicating things take a second look.”

“Once you know the basics to math, you know everything you need for any problem.”

——-

And, finally,
Learner #1: You were and are the most amazing teacher I have ever had
Learner #2: Can I second that?

 

—–

Okay, Now I have some tears. For realsies.

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